Hayburn Wyke to Whitby - the suggested 13mile RED (with 2308ft of ascent) 'classic coastal and cliff-top' linear walk from the delightful waterfall and hidden rocky cove of Hayburn Wyke visits the curiosity that is Ravenscar, the stunningly scenic former fishing village of Robin Hood’s Bay and the gothic delights of Whitby and its Abbey. Alternatively, should you opt to start from Ravenscar, the route is reduced to 9.5miles (with 1401ft of ascent).

Hayburn Wyke - A hidden cove washed by the North Sea and backed by dense woodland through which tumble attractive streams make Hayburn Wyke a lovely place to visit at any season of the year.
Smugglers - Because of the burden of high taxes smuggling was once commonplace. At one time, three quarters of all the tea drunk in Britain was reckoned to be smuggled. Brandy, gin and silk would also be brought in under the cover of darkness.
Peak Alum works at Ravenscar - Part of the world's first chemical industry along and near the North East coastline. Here the long process to make alum, used for fixing dye, took place. Key ingredients needed were seaweed and human urine!
Ravenscar - Famous as the town that never was. The roads and drains for this planned Victorian settlement were laid out, but the developers went bust. The plans for the town can be seen in the Raven Hall Hotel.
Robin Hoods Bay - No-one knows how Robin Hoods Bay got its name, but it was recorded as such from the 16th century. Local legends talk of a shooting competition between Little John and Robin Hood - Whoever shot furthest had the Bay named after them!
Whitby - An inspirational town, not least for some literary giants. Charles Dodgson visited several times before he wrote ‘Alice in Wonderland’ Bram Stokers Dracula is also thought to have been set in Whitby. Every year this gothic connection is recognised with the visit of thousands of Goths to Whitbys Goth Weekend.
Whitby High Light - Standing 70 metres above sea level, the Whitby Lighthouse flashes every 10 seconds. It has been fully automated since 1992 and is now controlled from Harwich.B Standing 70 metres above sea level, the Whitby Lighthouse flashes every 10 seconds. It has been fully automated since 1992 and is now controlled from Harwich.
Whitby Abbey - The original abbey was founded in 657 by Oswy, Saxon king of Northumbria and was the site of the Synod of Whitby in 664 which reconciled the Celtic Church of Northumbria with Rome. Sacked by the vikings in 867 and abandoned until it was refounded under orders of William de Percy.The second abbey flourished until the dissolution by Henry VIII in 1540.